Texas Heroes

Hamilton Prioleau Bee  (July 22, 1822 - October 3, 1897)
Bee was an American politician in early Texas who served one term as Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives. He later was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

Edward Clark 
(April 1, 1815 - May 4, 1880)
Clark was the eighth Governor of Texas and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

George Bibb Crittenden
  (March 20, 1812 - November 27, 1880)
Crittenden was a career Army officer who served in the Black Hawk War, the Army of the Republic of Texas, the Mexican-American War. He was also a Major General in the Confederate States Army.

Calvin Crozier 
(August, 1840 - September 8, 1865)
Crozier was a Confederate veteran who was unlawfully executed by soldiers of the 33rd Regiment, U.S. Colored Troops, at Newberry, SC.

Xavier Blanchard Debray
(January 25, 1818 - January 6, 1895)
Debray was a French-born soldier and diplomat who immigrated to the United States, settling in Texas. Debray raised a Confederate cavalry regiment from Bexar County and was appointed brigadier general before the war's end.

David Owen Dodd
  (November 10, 1846 - January 8, 1864)
Dodd was only seventeen-year-old when he was hanged as a spy by the Union army. He has been called the “boy hero of Arkansas” as well as “boy martyr of the Confederacy.”

Mathew Duncan Ector
  (February 28, 1822 – October 29, 1879)
Ector was an American legislator, Texas jurist, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

Richard Montgomery Gano
  (June 17, 1830 – March 27, 1913)
Gano as a physician, Protestant minister, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

Hiram Bronson Granbury
  (March 1, 1831 – November 30, 1864)
Granbury was a lawyer, a county judge in Texas, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. Granbury was one of the six Confederate generals killed at the Battle of Franklin.

Thomas Green 
(June 8, 1814–April 12, 1864)
Green was a lawyer, politician, soldier, officer of the Republic of Texas, and was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. Tom Green County, Texas was named after him.

Elkanah Bracken Greer 
(October 11, 1825 – March 25, 1877)
Greer was an antebellum cotton planter, merchant, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army and served in the Western Theater.

John Gregg 
(September 28, 1828 – October 7, 1864)
Gregg was an American judge, politician, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. He was killed in action during the Siege of Petersburg.

William Polk Hardeman 
(November 4, 1816 – April 8, 1898)
Hardeman was a member of the Texas Rangers, fought in the Mexican-American War, and was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

James Edward Harrison 
(April 24, 1815 - February 23, 1875)
Harrison was a two-term Mississippi state senator and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. After the war, he was a trustee of Baylor University.

Thomas Harrison 
(May 1, 1823 - July 14, 1891)
Harrison was a Mexican-American War veteran, a Texas state legislator, and a Brigadier General in the  Confederate States Army. After the war, he was a district judge in Waco.

James Morrison Hawes
  (January 7, 1824 – November 22, 1889)
Hawes participated in the Siege of Veracruz, and the battles of Contreras, Churubusco, and Molino del Rey. He was also a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

John Bell Hood
  (June 1, 1831 – August 30, 1879)
Hood was a Lieutenant General in the Confederate States Army. He had a reputation for bravery and  aggressiveness that sometimes bordered on recklessness.

Albert Sidney Johnson
  (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862)
Johnson served as a general in three different armies: the Texas Army, the United States Army, and the  Confederate States Army. He saw extensive combat during his military career. He saw action in the Texas War of Independence, the Mexican-American War, the Utah War, and the WBTS. Considered by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to be the finest general officer in the Confederacy before the emergence of Robert E. Lee. He was killed early in the War at the Battle of Shiloh and was the highest ranking officer, Union or Confederate, killed during the entire war. Davis believed the loss of Johnston "was the turning point of our fate"

Wilburn Hill King
  (June 10, 1839 – October 12, 1910)
King was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. He fled to Mexico after the War, but returned to Sulphur Springs Texas and served as mayor, state representative and adjutant general of Texas.

Walter Paye Lane
  (February 18, 1817 – January 28, 1892)
Lane served in the armies of the Republic of Texas, the United States, and was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

Francis Richard Lubbock
  (October 16, 1815 – June 22, 1905)
Lubbock was the ninth Governor of Texas and during his tenure he supported Confederate conscription. He worked to draft all able-bodied men, including resident aliens, into the Confederate States Army.

Hinche Parham Mabry
  (October 27, 1829 – March 21, 1884)
Mabry was a successful and prosperous lawyer and was a state legislator. He joined the Third Texas Cavalry, became Captain and established a reputation for audacity, courage, and strict discipline.

Samuel Bell Maxey
  (March 30, 1825 – August 16, 1895)
Maxey was a soldier, lawyer, and politician from Paris, Texas. He was a Major General for the Confederate States Army and later represented Texas in the U.S. Senate.

Benjamin McCulloch
  (November 11, 1811–March 7, 1862)
McCulloch was a soldier in the Texas Revolution, a Texas Ranger, a U.S. marshal, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

Henry Eustace McCulloch
  (December 6, 1816 – March 12, 1895)
McCulloch was a soldier in the Texas Revolution, a Texas Ranger, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

John Creed Moore
  (February 28, 1824 – December 31, 1910)
Moore was an Army officer and a graduate of West Point. He was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army and later worked in the educational system in Texas.

Allison Nelson
  (March 11, 1822 – October 7, 1862)
Nelson was the ninth mayor of Atlanta, Georgia and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

Horace Randal
  (January 1, 1833 – April 30, 1864)
Randall was a graduate of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. He was killed in action at the Battle of Jenkin's Ferry, Arkansas

John Henninger Reagan
  (October 8, 1818 - March 6, 1905)
Reagan was a leading 19th century American politician from Texas. He resigned from the House of Representatives when Texas seceded. He served in the cabinet of Jefferson Davis as Postmaster General.

Oran Milo Roberts   (July 9, 1815 - May 19, 1898)
Roberts chaired the Secession convention for Texas in 1861. He served as Governor from 1879-1883. He was Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court. He founded the law school at UT and was its first law Professor. He was a Colonel in the Confederate Army

Felix Huston Robertson
  (March 9, 1839 - April 20, 1928)
Robertson attended West Point but resigned early to offer services to the Confederacy. He was a Brigadier General and the only native Texan to achieve a wreath around his stars.

Jerome Bonaparte Robertson
  March 14, 1815 - January 7, 1890)
Robertson was a doctor, Indian fighter, Texas politician, and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.
He was noted for his service in the famed Texas Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia.

Lawrence Sullivan "Sul" Ross
  (September 27, 1838 - January 3, 1898)
Ross was the 19th Governor of Texas, a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. He was also a president of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, now called Texas A&M University.

Thomas Lafayette Rosser
  (October 15, 1836 - March 29, 1910)
Rosser was a Major General in the Confederate States Army, an officer in the Spanish American War, and a railroad construction engineer. A favorite of J.E.B. Stuart, he was noted for his daring cavalry raids, efficiency in handling combat troops, and tactical brilliance.

William Read Scurry
  (February 10, 1821 - April 30, 1864)
Scurry was a lawyer, a district attorney, a Major in the Mexican-American War and a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army

William Steele
  (May 1, 1819 - January 12, 1885)
Steele was a career Army officer who served with distinction during the Mexican–American War. He later served as a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

Marion DeKalb "M.D.K" Taylor
  (October 13, 1818 - June 22, 1897)
Taylor was a doctor and served twenty-four years in the Texas Legislature. He was elected President Pro Tempore of the Texas Senate twice. He also served as a Brigadier General for the 7th Militia Brigade.

Alexander Watkins Terrell
  (November 23, 1827 - September 9, 1912)
Terrell served as a district court judge and obtained the rank of brigadier general, but the war ended before his promotion was officially confirmed. He served in both the Texas Senate and House of Representatives, serving sixteen years in the state legislature. Terrell County, Texas is named in his honor.

Richard Waterhouse
  (January 12, 1832 - March 20, 1876)
As a teenager Waterhouse ran away from home to fight in the Mexican–American War. He was appointed Brigadier General but was not confirmed by the Confederate Senate until the last day the legislators were in session.

Thomas Neville Waul
  (January 5, 1813 - July 28, 1903)
Waul was a prominent Confederate politician. He represented Texas in the Provisional Confederate Congress and later was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

John Austin Wharton
  (July 23, 1828 - April 6, 1865)
Wharton was a lawyer, plantation owner, and a Major General in the Confederate States Army. He was considered one of the Confederacy's best tactical cavalry commanders.

John Wilkins Whitfield
  (March 11, 1818 - October 27, 1879)
Whitfield was a territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress representing the Kansas Territory. He was also a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army.

William Henry Chase Whiting
  (March 22, 1824 - March 10, 1865)
Whiting was an Army officer who resigned after 16 years in the Army Corps of Engineers. He was a Brigadier General in the Confederate States Army. He was wounded at the Second Battle of Fort Fisher by a musket ball to his leg. He died of Dysentery that entered his wounds.

Louis Trezevant Wigfall
  (April 21, 1816 - February 18, 1874)
Wigfall was an American politician from Texas who served as a member of the Texas Legislature, United States Senate, and Confederate Senate. He briefly served as a Brigadier General of the Texas Brigade before taking his seat in the Confederate Senate.

William Hugh Young
(January 1, 1838 - November 28, 1901)
Young was one of the youngest Brigadier Generals in the Confederate States Army. He was wounded a total of six times during the War.